Vienna Agreement 1815

Vienna Agreement 1815

These parties had not been part of the Chaumont Agreement, but had acceded to the Treaty of Paris (1814): negotiations can be considered as a choice of partners. In general, the negotiation is defined according to its content. What is the position of the conflicting parties and how far are the conflicting parties and, therefore, how difficult will the negotiation process be? However, we can also define negotiations on the basis of stakeholders, in the case of diplomatic negotiations: countries and their representatives, their representatives. From this perspective, it is the counterparties in conflict around the table, such as the distance between their interests, that will determine the course of the process, the options for convergence and closure by an agreement. Leaving a party out of the process could have serious implications for the value and viability of the contract; The party`s accession could hinder the process too much and, therefore, never be able to terminate the negotiation process. But the choice of parties is also a choice of choice of conviction. Since a party is not in a position to directly influence its counterparts, it will be obliged to do so indirectly, which in most cases is less effective than a direct negotiation process. However, Britain ratified the Quadrennial Alliance, signed on the same day as the Second Paris Peace Treaty (20 November 1815), by the same three powers that signed the Holy Alliance on 26 September 1815. It renewed the application of the congress system that advanced international relations in Europe. The Alliance was founded in 1813 to counter France and pledged its help. When France joined in 1818, it became the Quintuple Alliance. However, on the basis of the 1815 declaration of Viennese, signed by the major colonial powers, British diplomacy did not cease to pressure other states to extend the abolition of the slave trade to the entire Western world.

After the failure of British efforts to find a more concrete multilateral solution at the London conferences in 1816 and Aachen in 1818, Britain finally changed its strategy and asked other powers to sign bilateral agreements by which they accepted a reciprocal right to visit suspicious ships in international waters in peacetime. The signatory states also had to accept the creation of «Mixed Commissions for the Abolition of the Slave Trade», international tribunals to rule on the cases of captured slave ships. The first of these bilateral agreements with the United Kingdom was signed in 1817 by Portugal and Spain, and then by the Netherlands in 1818. In this way, Britain finally obtained a global ban allowing the British navy to more effectively implement the international ban on the slave trade until the 1840s. The final act, which embodied all separate contracts, was signed on June 9, 1815 (a few days before the Battle of Waterloo). The provisions were the same: although all Member States are reasonably equal, although they all have a say, they cannot act if at least two of the great powers do not agree. Indeed, the power of countries is reflected, to some extent, in the votes they can cast in the Council of Ministers, but very small and small countries have relatively more votes for fewer people. Even then, there is the political reality and the Union has clearly been built around Germany, France, the United Kingdom, with Italy, Spain and France as the second circle.

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